November 15th – Stakeholder Discussion & Advisory Committee Meeting

Stakeholder discussion:

The consultant team and staff members met with various stakeholders on November 15th to discuss economic development within the city and county. Stakeholders included local business representatives, economic development organizations, the chamber of commerce, developers, and residents. The conversation focused on current development roadblocks and issues, goals for future development, the importance of prioritizing infill and redevelopment, employment needs for workers and companies, the aesthetics of development and our gateways into the city and county, and developing sustainably.

 

Advisory Committee Meeting:

The Comprehensive Plan Advisory Committee met for the fifth time on November 15th. The agenda for the meeting included the following:

  • providing an update on the open house events that we held on November 9th,
  • discussing components of economic development, and
  • reviewing and discussing the proposed special interest areas.

The advisory committee discussed the following:

  • The updated vision statement – the committee provided recommendations for changes, including putting the vision statement in a bullet point format and removing some of the “fluffy” languages.
  • Regarding the draft goal for ‘Growth and Development’ – the committee commented that the goal language is very vague and that it may be more impactful to have Frankfort and Franklin County-specific language.
  • Demand for commercial and industrial development – data from KCDC was presented to provide a snapshot of the current demand for new development projects.
  • The proposed special interest area discussions focused on the following:
    1. Downtown Frankfort – The differences between north and south Frankfort and the various sub-districts and the appropriateness of mixed-use and non-residential uses along Central Ave and within south Frankfort.
    2. Holmes Street – The history and development patterns of this corridor, along with the previous and future planning efforts for this corridor.
    3. US 127 South – The appropriateness of residential and rural uses on the east side of US 127 and the potential for commercial and industrial uses on the west side of US 127, including promoting commercial uses to front the road and industrial uses to be pushed further back.
    4. I-64 Intersections – The US 60 interchange should focus on employment, mixed-use, and commercial uses; the US 127 interchange should promote employment uses in the southwest quadrant, commercial and mixed uses on the north side of I-64, and residential and neighborhood-scale uses in the southeast quadrant; and the SR 151 should remain a rural gateway into the county but could benefit from beautification and low-intensity rural commercial uses that would enhance the area.
    5. Riverlands – The land between the Kentucky River and Elkhorn Creek is some of the most beautiful in the county and has excellent potential for rural and low-intensity recreation, and tourism uses. Protecting the rivers is critical while also exploring ways to improve access and the usability of the rivers.

The next Advisory Committee meeting will be held on December 13th and will focus on transportation, connectivity, and utilities.

Stakeholder discussion:

The consultant team and staff members met with various stakeholders on November 15th to discuss economic development within the city and county. Stakeholders included local business representatives, economic development organizations, the chamber of commerce, developers, and residents. The conversation focused on current development roadblocks and issues, goals for future development, the importance of prioritizing infill and redevelopment, employment needs for workers and companies, the aesthetics of development and our gateways into the city and county, and developing sustainably.

 

Advisory Committee Meeting:

The Comprehensive Plan Advisory Committee met for the fifth time on November 15th. The agenda for the meeting included the following:

  • providing an update on the open house events that we held on November 9th,
  • discussing components of economic development, and
  • reviewing and discussing the proposed special interest areas.

The advisory committee discussed the following:

  • The updated vision statement – the committee provided recommendations for changes, including putting the vision statement in a bullet point format and removing some of the “fluffy” languages.
  • Regarding the draft goal for ‘Growth and Development’ – the committee commented that the goal language is very vague and that it may be more impactful to have Frankfort and Franklin County-specific language.
  • Demand for commercial and industrial development – data from KCDC was presented to provide a snapshot of the current demand for new development projects.
  • The proposed special interest area discussions focused on the following:
    1. Downtown Frankfort – The differences between north and south Frankfort and the various sub-districts and the appropriateness of mixed-use and non-residential uses along Central Ave and within south Frankfort.
    2. Holmes Street – The history and development patterns of this corridor, along with the previous and future planning efforts for this corridor.
    3. US 127 South – The appropriateness of residential and rural uses on the east side of US 127 and the potential for commercial and industrial uses on the west side of US 127, including promoting commercial uses to front the road and industrial uses to be pushed further back.
    4. I-64 Intersections – The US 60 interchange should focus on employment, mixed-use, and commercial uses; the US 127 interchange should promote employment uses in the southwest quadrant, commercial and mixed uses on the north side of I-64, and residential and neighborhood-scale uses in the southeast quadrant; and the SR 151 should remain a rural gateway into the county but could benefit from beautification and low-intensity rural commercial uses that would enhance the area.
    5. Riverlands – The land between the Kentucky River and Elkhorn Creek is some of the most beautiful in the county and has excellent potential for rural and low-intensity recreation, and tourism uses. Protecting the rivers is critical while also exploring ways to improve access and the usability of the rivers.

The next Advisory Committee meeting will be held on December 13th and will focus on transportation, connectivity, and utilities.

November 9th – Public Open House

Two public open house events were held on November 9th, 2022, at the Frankfort Plant Board building. These events were exactly the same, but at different times during the day. A total of 74 people attended both events. An online survey is also posted to allow people to continue to participate. At this time, 102 people have completed the online survey. The survey will close on December 1st, 2022.

The events began with a short presentation that provided an overview/refresher of the planning process, Phase One and Two updates, presenting the proposed vision statement, introducing land use planning, and describing the activity stations. Following the presentation, attendees were released to interact with the various activity boards.

The activity boards were posted around the room. They included one for the proposed vision statement, one for the draft existing land use map, and one for each proposed special area (Downtown Frankfort, Holmes Street Corridor, South 127 Corridor, Riverlands (area between the Kentucky River and Elkhorn Creek, north of the city boundaries), and the I-64 interchanges at SR 151, US 127, and US 60). Each board contained question prompts and input opportunities.

The feedback from the in-person meetings and the online survey will be reviewed and summarized following the survey’s close. That summary will be posted on the project website once it is completed.

Two public open house events were held on November 9th, 2022, at the Frankfort Plant Board building. These events were exactly the same, but at different times during the day. A total of 74 people attended both events. An online survey is also posted to allow people to continue to participate. At this time, 102 people have completed the online survey. The survey will close on December 1st, 2022.

The events began with a short presentation that provided an overview/refresher of the planning process, Phase One and Two updates, presenting the proposed vision statement, introducing land use planning, and describing the activity stations. Following the presentation, attendees were released to interact with the various activity boards.

The activity boards were posted around the room. They included one for the proposed vision statement, one for the draft existing land use map, and one for each proposed special area (Downtown Frankfort, Holmes Street Corridor, South 127 Corridor, Riverlands (area between the Kentucky River and Elkhorn Creek, north of the city boundaries), and the I-64 interchanges at SR 151, US 127, and US 60). Each board contained question prompts and input opportunities.

The feedback from the in-person meetings and the online survey will be reviewed and summarized following the survey’s close. That summary will be posted on the project website once it is completed.

October 18th – Stakeholder Discussions & Advisory Committee Meeting

Stakeholder Discussions

The consultant team and staff representatives met with four stakeholder groups on October 18th, – City of Frankfort Parks, Recreation & Historic Sites, Farmer’s Market, Woods & Waters Land Trust, and Canoe Kentucky – in order to have open discussions about their vision for the future of this region and input on the comprehensive plan process and content.

The conversation focused on visions for Franklin County’s parks, open spaces, and natural resource assets (i.e., major waterways and their tributaries, forested areas, hillsides, access to local healthy foods) and how residents and visitors can be better connected to them. Creating better access and supporting infrastructure to the Kentucky River and Elkhorn Creek for boating (motorized and paddle) and other water recreation with public parks throughout the County is a desire shared among the stakeholders. Strengthening relationships/partnerships between parks and open space landowners (public and private) and land users is essential in order to coordinate efforts to preserve, protect, enhance, and promote these assets to the community. 

 

Advisory Committee Meeting

The Comprehensive Plan Advisory Committee Meeting met for the fourth time on Tuesday, October 18th at 2:30. The agenda for this meeting was to discuss parks, open spaces, natural resources, and sustainability.

Public input from Phase One was reviewed to remind the group of key takeaways pertaining to parks, open spaces, natural systems, and sustainability that led to the identification of themes and priorities the team is further exploring during Phase Two. The overarching goals and system recommendations from the recent 2021 Frankfort Parks, Recreation & Historic Sites Master Plan were reviewed to familiarize the group with concurrent efforts by the City of Frankfort and its stakeholders.

The consultant team then presented an inventory summary of natural resources (i.e., forested areas, soils/geology, hillsides, and hydrology) that make Frankfort and Franklin County unique. Several case studies were presented as examples of how other communities have used district overlays as tools for highlighting and protecting special areas within a community. There were several interactive polls set up throughout the meeting to engage committee members and test priority areas and interests in using certain planning tools to protect, enhance, and promote parks, open space, rural areas, and natural resource assets.

The team then presented several slides that focused on adventure/nature recreation tourism as a way to both protect and celebrate Franklin County’s natural assets while connecting residents/visitors to nature and contributing to the city/county’s economy. Peer communities such as: Red River Gorge, KY; Asheville, NC; Greenville, SC; Knoxville, TN; and Chattanooga, TN were highlighted as communities that have incorporated adventure/nature recreation tourism as an integral part of their local economies and community identities.

The group discussed the importance of having services / amenities available to support successful regional nature recreation tourism such as lodging, transportation, and connective trails. Trails that connect the city and county’s assets (parks, preserves, schools, historic sites, recreation areas, etc.) improve awareness and access for both residents and visitors. The group discussed what types of trails and parks/recreation areas were needed throughout the county. The group ended the meeting by discussing what sustainability means for Frankfort and Franklin County and how it can be seen as a lens to view the comprehensive plan’s goals and strategies. 

The next meeting will be held on November 15th and will focus on Economic Development.

Stakeholder Discussions

The consultant team and staff representatives met with four stakeholder groups on October 18th, – City of Frankfort Parks, Recreation & Historic Sites, Farmer’s Market, Woods & Waters Land Trust, and Canoe Kentucky – in order to have open discussions about their vision for the future of this region and input on the comprehensive plan process and content.

The conversation focused on visions for Franklin County’s parks, open spaces, and natural resource assets (i.e., major waterways and their tributaries, forested areas, hillsides, access to local healthy foods) and how residents and visitors can be better connected to them. Creating better access and supporting infrastructure to the Kentucky River and Elkhorn Creek for boating (motorized and paddle) and other water recreation with public parks throughout the County is a desire shared among the stakeholders. Strengthening relationships/partnerships between parks and open space landowners (public and private) and land users is essential in order to coordinate efforts to preserve, protect, enhance, and promote these assets to the community. 

 

Advisory Committee Meeting

The Comprehensive Plan Advisory Committee Meeting met for the fourth time on Tuesday, October 18th at 2:30. The agenda for this meeting was to discuss parks, open spaces, natural resources, and sustainability.

Public input from Phase One was reviewed to remind the group of key takeaways pertaining to parks, open spaces, natural systems, and sustainability that led to the identification of themes and priorities the team is further exploring during Phase Two. The overarching goals and system recommendations from the recent 2021 Frankfort Parks, Recreation & Historic Sites Master Plan were reviewed to familiarize the group with concurrent efforts by the City of Frankfort and its stakeholders.

The consultant team then presented an inventory summary of natural resources (i.e., forested areas, soils/geology, hillsides, and hydrology) that make Frankfort and Franklin County unique. Several case studies were presented as examples of how other communities have used district overlays as tools for highlighting and protecting special areas within a community. There were several interactive polls set up throughout the meeting to engage committee members and test priority areas and interests in using certain planning tools to protect, enhance, and promote parks, open space, rural areas, and natural resource assets.

The team then presented several slides that focused on adventure/nature recreation tourism as a way to both protect and celebrate Franklin County’s natural assets while connecting residents/visitors to nature and contributing to the city/county’s economy. Peer communities such as: Red River Gorge, KY; Asheville, NC; Greenville, SC; Knoxville, TN; and Chattanooga, TN were highlighted as communities that have incorporated adventure/nature recreation tourism as an integral part of their local economies and community identities.

The group discussed the importance of having services / amenities available to support successful regional nature recreation tourism such as lodging, transportation, and connective trails. Trails that connect the city and county’s assets (parks, preserves, schools, historic sites, recreation areas, etc.) improve awareness and access for both residents and visitors. The group discussed what types of trails and parks/recreation areas were needed throughout the county. The group ended the meeting by discussing what sustainability means for Frankfort and Franklin County and how it can be seen as a lens to view the comprehensive plan’s goals and strategies. 

The next meeting will be held on November 15th and will focus on Economic Development.

September 20th – Advisory Committee Meeting

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Meeting Summary

At the September 20, 2022 Advisory Committee Meeting, the discussion focused on options for the future land use framework for Frankfort and Franklin County. Three different land use approaches were presented with pros and cons highlighted for each. Based on discussions at the meeting and with staff, a land use approach centered around mixed-use character areas is preferred along with specific areas of the city and county identified as special areas. These special areas would have a more in-depth analysis and set of recommendations than other areas of the city and county. This will continue to be discussed at future meetings and public events and can be adjusted accordingly based on future feedback and comments. The presentation also included a SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunity, Threat) analysis of the city and county based on the feedback from Phase One, and a summary of feedback comments from the committee’s review of the plan’s goals and policies.

A recorded presentation of the Advisory Committee meeting is available for the committee members who were unable to make it or for any public who may be interested. The next meeting will be held on October 18th and will address Parks, Recreation, and Natural Resources.

Meeting Summary

At the September 20, 2022 Advisory Committee Meeting, the discussion focused on options for the future land use framework for Frankfort and Franklin County. Three different land use approaches were presented with pros and cons highlighted for each. Based on discussions at the meeting and with staff, a land use approach centered around mixed-use character areas is preferred along with specific areas of the city and county identified as special areas. These special areas would have a more in-depth analysis and set of recommendations than other areas of the city and county. This will continue to be discussed at future meetings and public events and can be adjusted accordingly based on future feedback and comments. The presentation also included a SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunity, Threat) analysis of the city and county based on the feedback from Phase One, and a summary of feedback comments from the committee’s review of the plan’s goals and policies.

 

A recorded presentation of the Advisory Committee meeting is available for the committee members who were unable to make it or for any public who may be interested. The next meeting will be held on October 18th and will address Parks, Recreation, and Natural Resources.

August 16th – Advisory Committee Meeting & Stakeholder Discussions

Advisory Committee Meeting Summary

The Comprehensive Plan Advisory Committee met for the second time on Tuesday, August 16th. The agenda for this meeting was to discuss the schedule for all future meetings and public engagement events, to review and discuss demographic trends within the region, to review the key takeaways from the Phase 1 public engagement events, and to complete an exercise regarding the vision statement for the plan. The committee had an engaging discussion around the demographic trends in the region including the city and county’s population trends, age distribution, family types, household income distribution, housing construction timelines, and employment trends. For the visioning exercise, the committee voted on three options for a vision statement to determine if there was a preference for one among the group (vision statements are available for review in the meeting presentation). Of the eight Advisory Committee breakout table groups on hand, all but two voted for option #3. Each of the eight tables then worked to wordsmith the preferred vision statement as they saw necessary. The consultant will now take all the proposed edits to the vision statement and create an updated version that includes the comments from the group. The committee was also provided a handout that includes the first draft of goals and policies for the plan. The members were asked to take this handout home and to return their thoughts on this first draft at a later date. The committee’s next scheduled meeting is Tuesday, September 20th at 2:30 PM at the Paul Sawyier Public Library.

 

August 16th Stakeholder Discussions

Between 10:30 and 1:00 on August 16th, the consultant team and staff representatives met with two stakeholder groups in order to have open discussions about their concerns, thoughts, and ideas about the future of this region and the comprehensive plan process and content.

 

KCDC/DIG – Approximately 19 members of the Kentucky Capital Development Corporation (KCDC) and the Frankfort Development Interest Group (DIG) attended the meeting. The conversation focused on the kinds of development that are in demand in the region, the restrictions that current land use and zoning regulations have on development interests, their concerns with the additional costs associated with infill and redevelopment projects, the need to talk with major employers in the region to understand their current and future needs, the development opportunities that will exist along the 127 south corridor once utilities are expanded, workforce availability concerns, the need for a housing study, the need for infrastructure to support river and sports tourism, and the importance of having a comprehensive plan that is flexible and adaptable to account for future trends. The participants expressed their concerns regarding the weight and emphasis that certain groups may have over other groups within the community, and the need to be fair and equal throughout the process by evaluating the quantity and frequency of comments. It was also expressed that areas on the future land use plan need to be designated for potential industrial and other types of growth as quickly as possible because “we are losing out on opportunities by the day”.

 

Envision Stakeholder Discussion – Three representatives from Envision Franklin County attended the meeting. The conversation focused on their concerns about ensuring that engagement for the planning process reached out to diverse populations and income groups, the importance of improving the quality of development within the community, their ideas for an urban service boundary and the redevelopment of underutilized mixed use centers, the need for a housing study and the importance of infill and redevelopment to limit the amount of suburban sprawl into the county, their interest in form based zoning regulations, the need to increase the minimum lot size in the rural areas, concerns about homestead developments, the preservation of historic and cultural resources in the city and the county, and their ideas for how to illustrate different use types to the public.

Advisory Committee Meeting Summary

The Comprehensive Plan Advisory Committee met for the second time on Tuesday, August 16th. The agenda for this meeting was to discuss the schedule for all future meetings and public engagement events, to review and discuss demographic trends within the region, to review the key takeaways from the Phase 1 public engagement events, and to complete an exercise regarding the vision statement for the plan. The committee had an engaging discussion around the demographic trends in the region including the city and county’s population trends, age distribution, family types, household income distribution, housing construction timelines, and employment trends. For the visioning exercise, the committee voted on three options for a vision statement to determine if there was a preference for one among the group (vision statements are available for review in the meeting presentation). Of the eight Advisory Committee breakout table groups on hand, all but two voted for option #3. Each of the eight tables then worked to wordsmith the preferred vision statement as they saw necessary. The consultant will now take all the proposed edits to the vision statement and create an updated version that includes the comments from the group. The committee was also provided a handout that includes the first draft of goals and policies for the plan. The members were asked to take this handout home and to return their thoughts on this first draft at a later date. The committee’s next scheduled meeting is Tuesday, September 20th at 2:30 PM at the Paul Sawyier Public Library.

 

August 16th Stakeholder Discussions

Between 10:30 and 1:00 on August 16th, the consultant team and staff representatives met with two stakeholder groups in order to have open discussions about their concerns, thoughts, and ideas about the future of this region and the comprehensive plan process and content.

 

KCDC/DIG – Approximately 19 members of the Kentucky Capital Development Corporation (KCDC) and the Frankfort Development Interest Group (DIG) attended the meeting. The conversation focused on the kinds of development that are in demand in the region, the restrictions that current land use and zoning regulations have on development interests, their concerns with the additional costs associated with infill and redevelopment projects, the need to talk with major employers in the region to understand their current and future needs, the development opportunities that will exist along the 127 south corridor once utilities are expanded, workforce availability concerns, the need for a housing study, the need for infrastructure to support river and sports tourism, and the importance of having a comprehensive plan that is flexible and adaptable to account for future trends. The participants expressed their concerns regarding the weight and emphasis that certain groups may have over other groups within the community, and the need to be fair and equal throughout the process by evaluating the quantity and frequency of comments. It was also expressed that areas on the future land use plan need to be designated for potential industrial and other types of growth as quickly as possible because “we are losing out on opportunities by the day”.

 

Envision Stakeholder Discussion – Three representatives from Envision Franklin County attended the meeting. The conversation focused on their concerns about ensuring that engagement for the planning process reached out to diverse populations and income groups, the importance of improving the quality of development within the community, their ideas for an urban service boundary and the redevelopment of underutilized mixed use centers, the need for a housing study and the importance of infill and redevelopment to limit the amount of suburban sprawl into the county, their interest in form based zoning regulations, the need to increase the minimum lot size in the rural areas, concerns about homestead developments, the preservation of historic and cultural resources in the city and the county, and their ideas for how to illustrate different use types to the public.

July-August – Public Engagement Kick-off

Share your thoughts or questions with us!

Public Meetings

In-Person Attendees

Public Survey

Completed Surveys

July-August – Public Engagement Kick-off

Public Meetings

Public Survey

Attendees

Survey Completions

The Comprehensive Plan Public Kick-off began with an online survey and two meetings offered to the community. The survey ran the entire month of July and was closed on August 2nd, garnering 391 responses. The two public meetings took place on July 12th at Bondurant Middle School and July 27th at Franklin County High School. The meetings were facilitated by city and county staff and the consultants McBride Dale Clarion, Human Nature, and Strand Associates. More than 80 community members attended the meetings.  

The Kick-Off meetings and survey efforts were initiated to understand the broad concerns and needs of the community. Each meeting began with a presentation outlining the planning process, scope, and role of the public in creating the Frankfort and Franklin County Comprehensive Plan. Community members also discussed various opportunities and strategies for the future of Frankfort and Franklin County with staff and consultants. Several interactive exercises were conducted to gauge residents’ and stakeholders’ priorities for the region’s future:

  • An online polling activity;
  • A budgeting exercise;
  • A goals and objectives review of suitability for City and County; and
  • A visual preference and mapping exercise for local Transportation Infrastructure and Parks & Natural Resources.

The next steps in the Plan Process include survey and feedback analysis from the initial public engagement and an Advisory Committee meeting on August 16th, where the analysis of the kick-off phase will be presented to the members for discussion. You can explore the material and results from the survey and public meetings by tapping on the various buttons in this section. Please check back for future updates and additional public engagement opportunities. 

Share your thoughts and questions with us!

The Comprehensive Plan Public Kick-off began with an online survey and two meetings offered to the community. The survey ran the entire month of July and was closed on August 2nd, garnering 391 responses. The two public meetings took place on July 12th at Bondurant Middle School and July 27th at Franklin County High School. The meetings were facilitated by city and county staff and the consultants McBride Dale Clarion, Human Nature, and Strand Associates. More than 80 community members attended the meetings.  

The Kick-Off meetings and survey efforts were initiated to understand the broad concerns and needs of the community. Each meeting began with a presentation outlining the planning process, scope, and role of the public in creating the Frankfort and Franklin County Comprehensive Plan. Community members also discussed various opportunities and strategies for the future of Frankfort and Franklin County with staff and consultants. Several interactive exercises were conducted to gauge residents’ and stakeholders’ priorities for the region’s future:

  • An online polling activity;
  • A budgeting exercise;
  • A goals and objectives review of suitability for City and County; and
  • A visual preference and mapping exercise for local Transportation Infrastructure and Parks & Natural Resources.

The next steps in the Plan Process include survey and feedback analysis from the initial public engagement and an Advisory Committee meeting on August 16th, where the analysis of the kick-off phase will be presented to the members for discussion. You can explore the material and results from the survey and public meetings by tapping on the various buttons in this section. Please check back for future updates and additional public engagement opportunities. 

May 19th – Advisory Committee Meeting

The Advisory Committee for the Frankfort/Franklin County Comprehensive Plan Update had their first meeting on May 19, 2022. Attendance at the meeting included city and county staff members, consultant representatives from McBride Dale Clarion, Human Nature, and Strand Associates, and 19 of the 23 committee members. The committee members were selected by identifying representatives of key stakeholder groups in the city and county, along with members of the public that applied to be on the group and were selected anonymously by the Executive Steering Committee.

 

The meeting contents included covering the basics of comprehensive planning, the proposed process, information about upcoming public events and the project website, and the role of the committee members. The meeting ended with a mapping exercise where the members were asked to identify areas in Frankfort and Franklin County that need to be protected, areas of weakness, areas of opportunity, and areas of strength. The committee was divided up into six groups of between three and six people that worked together to identify the areas that they felt fell into each of the four categories. At the end of the meeting, each group shared some highlights of what they discussed and what they found important.

 

The next meeting date for this committee has not been set, and staff will be following up with committee members to identify days of the week and times that generally work for the members in order to identify a regular meeting day and time.

The Advisory Committee for the Frankfort/Franklin County Comprehensive Plan Update had their first meeting on May 19, 2022. Attendance at the meeting included city and county staff members, consultant representatives from McBride Dale Clarion, Human Nature, and Strand Associates, and 19 of the 23 committee members. The committee members were selected by identifying representatives of key stakeholder groups in the city and county, along with members of the public that applied to be on the group and were selected anonymously by the Executive Steering Committee.

 

The meeting contents included covering the basics of comprehensive planning, the proposed process, information about upcoming public events and the project website, and the role of the committee members. The meeting ended with a mapping exercise where the members were asked to identify areas in Frankfort and Franklin County that need to be protected, areas of weakness, areas of opportunity, and areas of strength. The committee was divided up into six groups of between three and six people that worked together to identify the areas that they felt fell into each of the four categories. At the end of the meeting, each group shared some highlights of what they discussed and what they found important.

 

The next meeting date for this committee has not been set, and staff will be following up with committee members to identify days of the week and times that generally work for the members in order to identify a regular meeting day and time.

City of Frankfort
315 W 2nd Street, Frankfort, KY 40601
502-875-8500
ecockley@frankfort.ky.gov
https://frankfort.ky.gov/

Franklin County
321 W Main Street, Frankfort, KY 40601
502-875-8751
robert.hewitt@franklincounty.ky.gov
https://franklincounty.ky.gov/

City of Frankfort
315 W 2nd Street, Frankfort, KY 40601
502-875-8500
ecockley@frankfort.ky.gov
https://frankfort.ky.gov/

Franklin County
321 W Main Street, Frankfort, KY 40601
502-875-8751
robert.hewitt@franklincounty.ky.gov
https://franklincounty.ky.gov/

NEW, Public survey! Share your thoughts with us.